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Local chapters of the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals are the fastest growing area of our organization. Over 20 chapters have been established since the program began in early 2014. Local chapters provide members with a local opportunity to collaborate and learn and raise the visibility of our organization. Whenever a group of APBP members, along with two co-chairs, come together, a chapter can be formed. If you are interested in starting a chapter, please contact Lauren Mangnall.

Current chapters


Chapter Resources

Sample chapter workplan
About APBP slide deck - in development
Fall 2016 Chapter Chat : “Now you’ve started an APBP Chapter…”

Logo Guidelines

Each chapter logo generally consists of 3-4 elements. Including  “apbp” in the brand font (Garamond lowercase) is required. “apbp” must be placed horizontally to ensure readability and consistency with other APBP materials

Local chapter logo elements

  1. “apbp” in Garamond lowercase
  2. Local iconography
  3. Chapter name*
  4. APBP logo figures - Must use the APBP logo figures if any figures of people walking and cycling are used.

*The chapter logo and official name do not have to necessarily be one in the same. In the example below, the chapter is the National Capitol Region but the logo reads “DC.”


APBP biker

APBP walker

Example logos


APBP expects to go through a re-branding exercise in 2017. We appreciate individual chapters willingness to revise logos to incorporate new branding.

Chapter webpages


Why is APBP forming chapters? Our profession is growing. Members are the face of the profession. Continued growth requires lively local networks. APBP members offer expertise for active, sustainable transportation, a functional and fashionable trend widely adopted by cities of all sizes that desire strong and inclusive economies, healthy, happy people and a viable workforce.

What do APBP chapters do? Chapters form to connect APBP members professionally and to help them build support for the work APBP members do. Activities can include meet-ups, networking, educational programs, guest speakers, webinar site hosting/discussions, field visits, mentorship, student engagement/instruction and local conferences.

Learn more about APBP's chapters in this recorded webinar session (10/31/2014):

How are APBP chapters formed? Wherever two of more APBP members come together, a chapter can be formed. APBP asks for two co-chairs to assure momentum.

Is there a fee to join an APBP chapter? Your membership dues are your admission ticket to chapter life. 

I’m ready to form a chapter. What’s next? Click here to review the “how to” and the chapter charter (members only; please sign in to the website to see this page). Two representatives of the chapter, both APBP members, must sign the charter to be approved by the APBP Board of Directors.

Ten reasons to start a local chapter:
  1. Help APBP members succeed
  2. Connect and engage APBP members
  3. Grow APBP members' knowledge and expertise
  4. Put a local face on APBP
  5. Create a feedback loop between APBP and APBP members
  6. Strengthen and grow the profession locally
  7. Promote interdisciplinary conversation and collaboration
  8. Work across disciplines to achieve local active, sustainable transportation goals
  9. Inspire creativity across jurisdictions and political divides
  10. Add value to and expand APBP membership
Five Recommended Elements of APBP Local Chapters
1.    Member Benefits
  • Social & networking events
  • Mentor opportunities
  • Contribute to the profession
  • Engage with APBP
2.    Program Diversity
  • Meet-ups – purely social or with program elements
  • Panels
  • Pecha Kucha sessions
  • Presentations by thought leaders and subject matter experts
  • Active Transportation Tours (i.e. Complete Streets tours)
  • Women Cycling Summit
3.    Professional Development
  • Host local and regional conferences
  • Host APBP webinars
  • Host APBP on-site workshops (accessibility, bicycle parking, complete streets)
4.    Effective Communication
  • To, from and between members
  • With other APBP chapters
  • Ensure strong member input into APBP programming
  • With other organizations
  • With local and regional government by recommending policies and engagement in public discussion
5.    Outreach
  • Students/academic programs
  • Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committees
  • Professionals in advocacy organizations
  • Pro bono work in underserved communities (e.g. walk and bike audits)
  • Senior mobility
  • Schools, parks, transit (Safe Routes to School; to Parks, to Transit)
  • Elected officials
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201 E. Main St. Suite 1405 | Lexington, KY 40507